Glossary

This reference article is a glossary. It is meant to provide a general overview of terms common to CrateDB Cloud. Because it forms a counterpart to the Glossary for CrateDB, we mainly cover terms here that are specific or primary to CrateDB Cloud; terms particular to the whole CrateDB architecture will appear in the CrateDB glossary instead. We hope this glossary will help you understand the basic meaning of concepts in the CrateDB Console, documentation, the Croud CLI, and other CrateDB Cloud-related sources. It is not meant to be a general guide to IT or IIoT terminology.

In entries, terms used that have entries of their own are cross-referenced through links. The entries are presented in alphabetical order.

Table of contents

Audit log

The Audit Log registers and displays all operations associated with a

particular organization. This includes operations on users, on clusters, on projects, and on consumers. The Audit Log can be found in the rightmost tab of the Organization overview page in the CrateDB Cloud Console. Only an organization admin has access to the Audit Log.

Azure AD

Azure AD (Active Directory) is Microsoft’s authentication and sign-in service for accessing Microsoft hosted services. CrateDB Cloud uses AzureAD as one of the means of sign-up and authentication for its service. For documentation on Azure AD, refer to the Microsoft documentation on Azure.

Cluster

Within each project, a project administrator can deploy any number of products. One such service is the deployment of clusters, which can be done through the CrateDB Cloud Console. A cluster is a set of two or more CrateDB instances (referred to as nodes) which form a single, distributed database. Effectively, each cluster within CrateDB Cloud is a hosted (part of) a database. Depending on the user’s subscription plan and scaling, each cluster will have a certain storage capacity and can process a certain amount of ingests and queries per second. Only actual cluster usage is billed.

A cluster has a name, a unique ID, as well as a storage and processing capacity and a number of nodes. Note that clusters are also versioned. For information on how to deploy a cluster, please see our tutorial for deploying a CrateDB Cloud cluster from scratch.

Console

The CrateDB Cloud Console is the hosted user interface for CrateDB Cloud. It is a fully supported, easy-to-use UI which allows customers to interact with every aspect of the CrateDB Cloud service (subject to user role permissions.) While CrateDB Cloud also supports a CLI for interacting with the service, we assume use of the Console by default. Only the Console allows deployment of a cluster.

For information on how to use specific elements of the Console, refer to our Console overview.

See also

Console overview

Consumer

A consumer in the sense used for CrateDB Cloud architecture and documentation is an entity that reads event data from an IoT hub. It is possible to use a consumer, such as Azure IoT Hub, with CrateDB Cloud: you can store the data processed by the consumer on the Cloud cluster. For a tutorial on how to do this, see this article on our blog. Operations on consumers are registered in the Audit Log.

Croud

Croud is the name of the CrateDB Cloud Command-Line Interface (CLI). You can use Croud to interact with the organization, projects and products you have access to. Croud is intended for customers who prefer a CLI to the use of a hosted web interface such as the CrateDB Cloud Console. Note however that the Console is the default way to interact with CrateDB Cloud, and currently clusters can only be deployed within the Console. The documentation for Croud can be found under Croud CLI.

See also

Croud CLI

DTU

DTU stands for Database Transaction Unit. CrateDB Cloud uses DTUs to create configurations (combinations) of hardware specifications for specific subscription plans. The advantage is that the customer does not need to specify every element of the hardware configuration themselves, but can simply identify the price per DTU for a given plan and see how it matches their use case. This makes using the CrateDB Cloud offer and scaling to need easy and accessible.

For a more detailed description of the subscription plans and associated DTUs, refer to our documentation.

Endpoint

An endpoint is the end or goal of a communication channel. A user or client communicates with an endpoint via a defined method, which returns a defined set of data. In CrateDB Cloud, different profiles can be used to configure their own associated endpoints, which a user connects to via the Croud CLI. For information on how to do this, see the Croud documentation.

See also

Croud CLI

IIoT

The abbreviation IIoT refers to the “Industrial Internet of Things”. It is a version of IoT, but specifically developed for application in industrial manufacturing. In this context, the gathering, transfer, and storage of data gathered by digital devices installed on machines supports greater efficiency and automation potential in the manufacturing sector.

IoT

IoT stands for the “Internet of Things”. In essence, the Internet of Things refers to the connecting of multiple computers or digital devices, often part of existing appliances or physical infrastructure, in such a way that they can communicate with one another without the need for human (inter)action. In IoT systems, each digital device is provided with a unique ID and communicates with other devices on that basis, in particular for the transfer and receiving of data. When used in manufacturing and industrial applications, it is also called IIoT.

Offer

An offer or subscription offer is a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) product prepared for consumer purchase on a subscription basis. CrateDB Cloud has an offer on the Microsoft Azure Marketplace and on the AWS Marketplace.

Organization

Organizations represent the larger structure - for example a company - within which CrateDB Cloud projects and associated products are deployed. At the organization level there is always at least one organization administrator, who can in turn add organization members. Such organization admins and members have access to the projects run by the organization. (For more on user roles in CrateDB Cloud and how to manage them, see our reference for user roles.)

Each organization has a name, a unique ID, and optionally an associated email address. For information on how to create an organization, please refer to our guide to creating a new organization.

Product

A product in the sense used in CrateDB Cloud is something that uses the Cloud service for the storage of data. It consists of either a consumer or a cluster and is run within a project of an organization.

Profile

In CrateDB Cloud’s CLI, Croud, profiles are sets of configuration options. They define API endpoints and the desired output format of interaction with those endpoints. A Croud user can create multiple profiles and switch between them as desired.

See also

Croud CLI

Project

A project is contained within an organization. A project exists to contain any number of associated services (see products) deployed in a particular region for a specific organizational need. For example, an organization may use distinct projects to separate between development and production environments.

A given organization can have any number of projects. Just as organizations have administrators and members, so projects have their own administrators and members. The two groups can but need not overlap. (For more on user roles in CrateDB Cloud and how to manage them, see our reference for user roles.)

Each project has a name, an associated region, and a unique ID. For information on how to create a project, please refer to our guide to creating a new project.

Region

A region in the sense used for CrateDB Cloud is a set of data centers (servers) grouped together on a geographic basis so as to not exceed a certain latency.

SaaS

SaaS stands for “Software-as-a-Service”. It refers to a model where software is provided to customers on a subscription basis, rather than a one-off payment, and is centrally hosted. Besides the default option of subscribing directly, CrateDB Cloud can be used as a service through its SaaS offer on Microsoft Azure Marketplace and the AWS Marketplace.

Scale unit

The CrateDB Cloud subscription plans each come with a number of different scale units. Each scale unit represents an (additional) unit multiplying the specific combination of hardware capacity that applies to that plan.

The relationship between scale units and DTUs is subtle. Each scale unit added on top of the first scale unit also represents one additional DTU. However, not all plans start at one DTU. For more detailed information about subscription plans, scale units, and DTUs, take a look at our documentation on DTUs and subscription plans.

Subscription

A subscription is - for the purposes of CrateDB Cloud - a container in which the CrateDB Cloud service is created and managed. You can purchase a CrateDB Cloud subscription by following the steps in our tutorial. In the case of our SaaS offers on the cloud provider marketplaces, customers subscribe to CrateDB Cloud through that particular cloud provider.

The billing for a particular instance of the CrateDB Cloud service is managed per subscription. On Microsoft Azure, a given customer can have multiple subscriptions. This can be practical in case that customer wants to separate different instances of using the CrateDB Cloud service into different billing accounts.

Subscription plan

CrateDB Cloud’s service comes with several possible subscription plans. These plans are combinations of hardware specifications that are geared towards particular customer use cases: lower capacity vs. higher capacity, more storage vs. more processing power, and so forth. They can also be further adjusted for different scale units per plan. Currently there are four subscription plans available, as well as a separate contract option via our marketplace offers. For more information, refer to our documentation on subscription plans.

System user

In CrateDB Cloud, there are two distinct system users:

  • One is the “SYSTEM” user in the Audit Log. This is an internal user that logs the results of (attempted) scaling operations.
  • The other is the “system” user in the CrateDB backend. For more information on this second user, refer to our explanation in the CrateDB Cloud reference.

See also

Audit Log

User

A user in CrateDB Cloud is any individual account authorized to interact with some part of an organization’s assets. Each user has a defined role within the organization (see our reference on user roles) and is associated with a specific email address.

Note

Note that currently each CrateDB Cloud user corresponds to only one organization.

See also

User roles

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